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Player Piano Action
(Mechanical Drawings)

All of the 'Original' drawings on this web page were contributed to Player-Care by Don Teach. They were all used in the Danquard Player Action School of New York, circa 1917-1918, and drawn by C. H. Short. Because of their large file size (1.5 M+), the Original images of the drawings had to be optimized to be presented on this page. However, the optimized images are virtually identical in appearance to the originals.

The 'Cleaned and Optimized' images just below were cleaned up in Paint Shop Pro, and optimized using Interactive JPEG Optimizer. That work was done by me, John A Tuttle. For easier viewing, I have 'force-limited'* the width of the images to 220 pixels. Therefore, if you Right-Click on an image, you can download the full size drawing into your computer. (Use the 'Save Picture As' option..) If you Left-Click any of the 'Cleaned and Optimized images, another browser window will open and you can view a full size drawing that was re-drawn by Steven Hager. Over time, I plan to add color to the drawings that Steven Hager created to make it easier to tell which parts are made of wood, metal, leather, felt, and Bakelite. Steven drew the images in his spare time and donated the work to Player-Care.

Below the 'Cleaned and Optimized' images are the 'Original' images that were contributed by Don Teach. As with the 'Cleaned and Optimized' images, I have limited the width of the images to 200 pixels. Therefore, if you Right-Click on an image, you can download the full size drawing into your computer. (Use the 'Save Picture As' option..)

I am very thankful to both Don Teach and Steven Hager for their selfless time and effort in making these images and drawings available to Player-Care and ultimately the general public.

Cleaned and Optimized - (Thumbnail Pix)
'Left-Click' on the image to view the Full-Size, Re-Drawn 'Hager' Image in a new browser window.
'Right-Click' on the image to Download it to your computer (use the 'Save Picture As' option).

A.B. Chase

Amphion
Angelus
Baldwin (Manualo)
Cable (original)
Cable (improved)
Cheney
Gate Box
Gulbransen
Kranich & Bach
Ludwig
Metalnola
Pratt & Read
Schubert
Simplex
Wasle Unique (old style)
Wasle Unique (new style)
Weser
Winter
. Air-O-Player
Tracker



Originals- Thumbnail Size Pictures
(Resized and Optimized)

'Left-Click' on the image to view the Full-Size Original Image in a new browser window.
'Right-Click' on the image to Download it to your computer (use the 'Save Picture As' option).

Note: To download an untouched original image, 'Left-Click' on an image below and then, once
it opens in the new browser, 'Right-Click' on the image and click on the 'Save Picture As' option.

A.B. Chase
Amphion
Angelus
Baldwin (Manualo)
Blasius
Cable
Cheney
Gate Valve
Gulbransen
Kranich & Bach
Ludwig
Metalnola
Pratt-Reed
Schubert
Simplex
Wasle (Old)
Wasle (New)
Weser
Winter
Air-O-Player
Tracker







Don Teach
318 798 6000
FAX 318 797 4572
Shreveport Music Co.
1815 E 70th Street
Shreveport, LA
71105
Steven Hager
10 Prospect Drive South
Huntington Station, NY
11746-2923






Force-Limiting is a seldom used feature in web page design which is best understood by explaining how it works. When it comes to presenting graphics (or images) on a web page, the designer has a few options depending on the physical size of the image and how much space he wants to use on the web page. When there are numerous images, other factors such as the required storage space (or file size) and the download time (how long it takes for the images to download to the user's computer), are also considered. However, as a large image is reduced in size, it becomes less vivid. In other words, there's a trade-off between size and clarity. For example, when a complex image that is 12" x 12" is reduced in size to one that is 2" x 2", the resolution becomes so poor that you really can't make out any of the important details in the image. On the other side of the coin, a 12" x 12" image doesn't fit neatly on a web page that's typically only eight or ten inches wide. With Force-Limiting, the full-sized image is actually downloaded to the user's browser, but the image that's seen by the user is much smaller in appearance. This allows the designer to fit a lot more images in a much smaller space, which makes it easier for the user to see what's available. Another benefit of Force-Limiting is that it allows the user to download the full size image without opening another browser. As explained above, the user can simply 'Right-Click' on any image and select the 'Save Picture As' option to download that image into their computer. And, once the image is in the user's computer, they can examine all the fine details at their leisure.

Also, realizing that some people might not want to download images or files into their computer, I have also hyperlinked every image to a larger, more detailed image. In the cases above, I have linked the 'thumbnail' images to either a redrawn or an original image. Once these images open in another browser, they can likewise be downloaded into the user's computer using the method explained previously. Using these design techniques, I have been able to present the best quality and most detailed images to the user, with the least amount of effort on the user's part. I hope you find my work worth the effort.

Signed,

John A Tuttle

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John A Tuttle

This page was last revised March 12, 2015 by John A. Tuttle, who Assumes No Liability
For The Accuracy or Validity of the Statements and/or Opinions
Expressed within the Pages of the Player-Care Domain.
Cartoon Graphics by "Eric Styles"

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